Homeschooling in Nevada

Can Homeschoolers Become Properly Socialized?

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"But What About Socialization?"
Children Educated at Home Don't Become Social Misfits
Steve Moitozo
A discussion of research disputing the common misconception that children who are homeschooled do not have normal social development. Reinforces the concept that homeschooling can be a positive experience in both the academic and social realm.
Hackschooling Makes Me Happy: Logan LaPlante at TEDx
When 13 year-old Logan LaPlante grows up, he wants to be happy and healthy. He discusses how hacking his education is helping him achieve this goal.
Homeschool Socialization: An Imaginary Problem
Michelle Cannon
"What about socialization?" It is the most persistent of all questions posed to homeschool parents? But is it a valid issue?
Homeschooling and Socialization Revisited
Milton Gaither
Richard G. Medlin, a psychology professor at Stetson University, here continues a line of inquiry he began in one of the landmark articles of the original 2000 Peabody Journal homeschooling special issue. Since that article he has published several pieces in the journal Home School Researcher, all of which find very positive results for homeschoolers’ social and academic development. In this piece his goal is to review research on homeschooler socialization that has appeared since his 2000 article.
Homeschooling Statistics: Socialization and Sociability
Sara Mcgrath
According to Patrick Basham, author of the Fraser Institute's 2007 examination of homeschooling's growth from extreme to mainstream, "...the academic and socialization outcomes for the average home schooled child are superior to those experienced by the average public school student." When the socialization of homeschoolers is questioned, it's important to clearly define what the critic is asking. For example, how is socialization, an institutional training process, different from extracurricular social interactions, socializing, and sociability?
How to Develop Social Skills Without Socialization
Megan Zechman
The homeschooling community is wide and diverse, yet there is one question that almost every parent has been asked during the years they school their children at home. “What about socialization?” We are led to believe that if we don’t put our children in public school, they will be missing out. They will become social misfits. Homeschooling means they will be stuck inside all day, having no opportunity for socialization. But true socialization comes from interacting with the world around them and having the freedom to explore and make true friendships.
I’m concerned that my child will be isolated and miss out on socialization while we are homeschooling
Oak Meadow
This is a very common concern we hear from families new to homeschooling, and it is a question homeschoolers hear from other people on a regular basis. Experience has shown us that most children who homeschool spend plenty of time interacting with others. Since homeschoolers generally have more free time to be involved in community activities than children who attend “regular” school, there is no end to the socialization opportunities for them.
Let's Hope They're Not Socialized
Raising counter-cultural kids means that the traditional notion of socialization doesn't have much meaning. Centering on family rather than peer groups offers a new way of socialization.
Looking for the “S” Word: Socialization for the Homeschool Student
Veteran homeschoolers know that socialization is really not something to worry about in the homeschool, even for those who are moms to only children. The truth is children receive social instruction in the very environment where it is needed - society. As parents we are best equipped to direct the "socialization" of our children because we have their best interest at heart. Here are ten ways to find socialization opportunities for your homeschool student.
Making friends through homeschooling (without worrying about socialization)
Kara Anderson
Here’s the thing with socialization: We all know that true “socialization” is not just finding yourself in a group. “Socialization” as a homeschooling family is tricky: you can try to force it, and know the whole time that you are living in a contrived state that will please your family doctor and weird neighbor. But friendship is easier. You find people who like you. It may take a while, but the wait is worth it.
Socialization: Homeschoolers Are in the Real World
Chris Klicka
Academically homeschoolers have generally excelled, but some critics have continued to challenge them on an apparent “lack of socialization” or “isolation from the world.” Often there is a charge that homeschoolers are not learning how to live in the “real world.” However, a closer look at public school training shows that it is actually public school children who are not living in the real world.
Socialization: Tackling Homeschooling’s “S” Word
Bridget Bentz Sizer
The mainstream perception of homeschool students is that they are an antisocial bunch, toiling away lonely hours at a kitchen table with only their parents for friends. But homeschoolers themselves will tell you that socialization—the “S-word,” as some call it—is really a nonissue.
Socializing the Sanguine Child
Dianna Kennedy
Dianna Kennedy shares the socialization adventures of her sanguine daughter.
Statistics on Public School vs. Homeschool
Karen Frazier
Deciding how your child will receive his education is a choice that can impact the rest of his life. While your decision may depend on personal factors such as your time and availability and your child's personality, evaluating studies and statistics can also provide information you can include in your decision making process.
The Myth of Socialization
Diane S. Spears, Ed.D.
If socializing is a problem for homeschool families, it is rare. The homeschool socialization myth is a misconception perpetrated by people who know little or nothing of the benefits or facts. Some parents believed they would be breaking the law by not sending their children to public school. Unfortunately, there are movements in some states to pass such laws. But as of yet, it is still lawful to homeschool. Most states require documentation, which is reasonable. Other states are lax. Homeschooling as a movement is growing, and that is a very good thing. According to NHERI, the higher quality of homeschooling is not affected at all by whether or not the parent is a certified teacher, or by any state regulations.
The Truth about Homeschooling and Socialization
Lucinda H Kennaley
The reality of homeschool socialization is that there are usually more opportunities to socialize than there is time. The crush of activities, friends, and interactions with others keeps most homeschoolers more than busy.
What About Socialization?
If only homeschoolers had a nickel for every time they heard the question, "... but what about socialization?" That infamous socialization question, for any seasoned homeschooler, is quite a humorous one! Although non-homeschoolers worry that homeschooling may turn children into social misfits, we know that the opposite is true and that positive socialization is one of the best reasons to homeschool your children.
What Is Socialization Anyway?
Marci Goodwin
Many people seem to think that homeschool kids are all socially backward and sheltered. They feel that they need to be properly socialized or they won’t be able to function in the real world. And by properly socialized, they mean exposed to large groups of children their own age for 8+ hours per day so they can learn to act like the average child their age. Their question makes be wonder “What is socialization anyway?”
What’s the Point of Socialization?
Socialization is a pretty hot topic for those in the homeschooling circles. Many of us are asked how we socialize our kids, how our kids will know how to interact with others, and other questions that really go to the root of how our children will be able to function well in society. Now, the big question is whether each person needs to go to a school setting in order to be socialized.
Why are homeschooled kids so annoying?
Dwija Borobia
The biggest concern among the concerned is socialization. In other words: homeschooled kids are annoying and weird, and you don't want your kids to be annoying and weird, do you? Well, why are homeschooled kids so annoying? Because no one tells them that the way God made them isn't cool enough.
You Say Sheltering As If It’s A Bad Thing….
laurie Bostwick
Merriam Webster dictionary defines shelter as “a position or the state of being covered and protected." Sheltering can be a form of socialization. And children that are raised protected and nurtured know how to be social.


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